Fire History in the Appalachians, October 20-22

Register now for free workshop. Space is limited!

After a fire, charcoal can remain in the soil for long periods of time, and surviving trees are scarred. Workshop participants will see a demonstration of soil charcoal sampling and examine fire-scarred trees on Brush Mountain in Jefferson National Forest, VA.  Photo from U.S. Forest Service archives, courtesy of Bugwood.org.
After a fire, charcoal can remain in the soil for long periods of time, and surviving trees are scarred. Workshop participants will see a demonstration of soil charcoal sampling and examine fire-scarred trees on Brush Mountain in Jefferson National Forest, VA. Photo from U.S. Forest Service archives, courtesy of Bugwood.org.

Register now: “Fire History in the Appalachians Workshop and Central Appalachians FLN Workshop”

Fire has shaped the ecosystems of the Appalachian Mountains for millennia, and an area’s fire history can guide land managers who use prescribed fire for ecosystem restoration or reducing hazardous fuels.

On October 20-22, the Consortium of Appalachian Fire Managers and Scientists (CAFMS) will sponsor a workshop on fire history in the Appalachians. Presenters include managers and scientists from the U.S. Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy, and universities. Presentations will cover techniques for studying fire history, the ecological implications of fire history, and how fire history is relevant to current land management.

Attendees must register for the workshop. Registration is free, but space is limited. The workshop will be held at the Mountain Lake Lodge in Pembroke, Virginia. Discounts are available for workshop attendees – ask for the Fire History Workshop room block to get a rate of $83.00 per night. The deadline to receive the discounted rate is September 21st. If you need to stay before or after the meeting, the lodge will honor the discounted rate 2 days prior and 2 days after the meeting.

Check-in for the workshop begins at 8:00 a.m. on October 20, and presentations will be given all day. On October 21, attendees will visit the Jefferson National Forest for a fire history and prescribed burn field trip. The field trip leaves the lodge at 9:45 a.m. The first stop will be Brush Mountain, an easily accessible site with fire-scarred trees. After a demonstration of soil charcoal sampling, participants will drive eastward along the Craig Creek valley, stopping for lunch at a spot in the valley with a scenic view toward the north slope of Brush Mountain. This stop will provide a landscape perspective on the terrain and vegetation patterns in the vicinity of the fire history study. In the afternoon, we will continue toward New Castle, Virginia to visit stands that have been burned recently to apply our understanding of fire history to attempt to restore fire-associated vegetation.

The Central Appalachians Fire Learning Network will convene on October 22 from 8:30 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. for a focused dialog on collaborative success stories, stakeholder engagement, new technological tools, northern long-eared and other forest bats, and fire effects monitoring.

For more information, email Helen Mohr at hmohr@fs.fed.us

 

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