Forests of Mississippi, 2014

FIA Resource Update

Forester Christine Harper takes inventory on the Biennville Ranger District in Mississippi. Photo by U.S. Forest Service.
Forester Christine Harper takes inventory on the Biennville Ranger District in Mississippi. Photo by U.S. Forest Service.

The U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station recently published Forests of Mississippi, 2014, which provides an overview of forest resources in Mississippi based on inventory conducted by the SRS Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) unit in cooperation with the Mississippi Forestry Commission. The estimates in the update are for measurement year 2014 with comparisons made to data reported in 2006.

Information from the report includes:

  • Mississippi is home to some 19.4 million acres of forest land. Forest land has decreased by one percent (191,469 acres) since 2006.
  • At 7.5 million acres, the loblolly-shortleaf pine forest type occupies the largest proportion of Mississippi forest land. The next most common forest-type groups are oak-hickory (4.9 million acres), oak-gum-cypress (2.5 million acres), and oak-pine (2.0 million acres).
  • Overall, the majority (69 percent) of Mississippi’s forests regenerate naturally.
  • FIA crews recorded 113 tree species on Mississippi forest land. Though loblolly pine accounts for 39 percent of live tree volume, hardwoods still dominate overall.
  • Mississippi’s forest land contains 830 million dry tons of aboveground live-tree biomass, which equates to 415 million tons of carbon. Private landowners own 88 percent of aboveground live-tree biomass.
  • Tree removals in Mississippi are, on average, about 3 percent of total standing volume per year. The growth-to-removals ratio is 1.9, which suggests that Mississippi is growing more trees than are being removed through harvest or conversion of forest land to other land uses.
  • In Mississippi, mills produced 203 million cubic feet of wood residue in 2011 and used nearly 100 percent of those residues for industrial fuel, fiber products, or other uses.

 

Access the full text of the report.

For more information, email Sonya Oswalt as soswalt@fs.fed.us.

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