Managing Future Ecological Change in the Southeast

SRS Center for Integrated Forest Science co-Sponsors conference on conservation and natural resource management in an uncertain future

Longleaf pine stand at Jones Ecological Research Center in Ichauway, GA, where the conference was held. Photo by Jones Center.
Longleaf pine stand at Jones Ecological Research Center in Ichauway, GA, where the conference was held. Photo by Jones Center.

U.S. Forest Service scientists helped develop and participated in a unique conference aimed at developing a new region-level model for managing changes affecting natural resources.

Forest Service Southern Research (SRS) scientists Jim Vose and Dave Wear, project leaders of the SRS Center for Integrated Forest Science, Kier Klepzig, SRS assistant director, and Chris Oishi, research ecologist at the SRS Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, participated in the Ichuaway Conference held in Bainbridge, Georgia, November 5-7. 

Supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation, the conference focused on developing a vision for managing and mitigating ecological change at the Southeastern region.  

Top national and international scientists involved in research on climate change, socioeconomics and land use change, water resources, and ecosystem dynamics convened with land managers and conservation leaders to address the topic of how to manage southern ecosystems under rapidly changing and potentially novel conditions. Conference themes centered on identifying major factors driving ecological change over the next 50 years, determining essential knowledge required to manage novel ecosystems, and developing strategies for directing ecological change at the regional scale in the southeastern United States.    

Vose and Wear helped develop the conference with scientists from the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center and the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology

For more information, email Jim Vose at jvose@fs.fed.us or Dave Wear at dwear@fs.fed.us

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