News and Events

Targeted Deer Removal Can Reduce Deer-Vehicle Collisions

Deer-vehicle collisions are common, dangerous, and costly examples of human-wildlife conflict in the U.S. Targeted removal (sharpshooting) of deer that linger on the side of the road has proven effective in reducing such conflict in urban areas. USDA Forest Service research wildlife biologist John Kilgo, along with collaborators, tested this strategy in a secure, wooded area that is off-limits to the public.


Wetland Silviculture and Water Tables

Water tables are everywhere, but their levels fluctuate – especially in the poorly drained clay soils of coastal South Carolina. Topography also affects water tables, and forested wetlands in the Coastal Plain tend to be flat. “They respond rapidly to rainfall and evapotranspiration,” says Devendra Amatya, a USDA Forest Service research hydrologist.


Longleaf Pine on the Santee Experimental Forest

In 1989, South Carolina’s Francis Marion National Forest lost close to a third of its pine and hardwood trees to Hurricane Hugo. USDA Forest Service land managers have spent the last thirty years recovering from that disturbance and working to meet the state’s growing needs for clean water, forest products, recreation areas, and wildlife habitat.


Diets of Nestling Red-Headed Woodpeckers

The red-headed woodpecker has enjoyed better days. Over the past five decades, the species has suffered sharp declines in the northern and western parts of its range. While that much is clear, the role of their diets in the declines is not. A recent USDA Forest Service study observed the diets of nestling woodpeckers to aid with conservation efforts.


Longleaf Pine on the Santee Experimental Forest

In 1989, South Carolina’s Francis Marion National Forest lost close to a third of its pine and hardwood trees to Hurricane Hugo. USDA Forest Service land managers have spent the last thirty years recovering from that disturbance and working to meet the state’s growing needs for clean water, forest products, recreation areas, and wildlife habitat.

To that end, the Francis Marion adopted a new forest plan in 2017 focused upon restoring longleaf pine, the once-dominant southern species, across 33,000 acres of national forest lands.


Putting Mangrove Data to Work in East Africa

Mangrove forests are among the most carbon-rich ecosystems on the planet. Their stilt-like roots trap carbon and other nutrients that rivers have carried to the coastal deltas where mangroves grow. They act as a buffer, protecting coastlines and the people who live there from increasingly strong seas and storm surges. People depend on mangrove forests as nurseries for fish and as sources of wood fuel and timber.


Immigration and Reproduction Complicate Coyote Control Programs

Coyotes arrived in the Southeast relatively recently. “Beginning in the early 20th century, coyotes started moving eastward,” says John Kilgo, a research biologist with the U.S. Forest Service. “But they weren’t recorded in South Carolina until the late 1970s.”


Protecting White-Tailed Deer Fawns

Wild animals are often immersed in a mortal struggle. For white-tailed deer fawns, the struggle entails hiding from predators like coyotes.


Mangroves of Mozambique

Whether small and shrubby or tall and majestic, mangroves have an unusual ability – they are specially adapted to grow in brackish water, and can tolerate ocean waves lapping at their stilt-like roots. As stands mature, soil and decaying plant matter becomes captured in the intricate web of their roots.


Switchgrass in Pine Plantations

In the southeastern U.S., loblolly pine plantations cover about 37 million acres of land. “Growing switchgrass in loblolly pine plantations could provide a sustainable source of biomass for cellulosic energy,” says U.S. Forest Service research hydrologist Devendra Amatya.


News

Extreme Precipitation Event at Santee EF topic of Presentation

Extreme and prolonged flooding in many parts of South Carolina on Oct. 3 and 4 2015 was a result associated with Hurricane Joaquin that came into the eastern Atlantic Coast. The persistent deep easterly flow, the continuous supply of moisture, and the circulation of the hurricane caused this extreme weather event. Dr. Devendra Amatya, Research Hydrologist, has studied, written and presented on this event. He also presented at an invited session organized by the Southeastern Section of Geological Society of America in Columbia, SC. Preliminary Hydro-meteorologic Assessment of an Extreme Precipitation Event on Santee Experimental Forest Watersheds. He also presented his findings at the South Carolina Water Resources Conference also in Columbia, SC (Extreme Precipitation Event on Santee Experimental Forest Watersheds, SC).


The Santee Experimental Forest

In 1934, the U.S. Forest Service allocated 6,100 acres (2,470 ha) of the Francis Marion National Forest (Francis Marion) near Charleston, South Carolina, for the Santee Experimental Forest.


U.S. Forest Service Scientist Helps Establish First Mangrove Experimental Forest in Africa

Mangrove forests stabilize the tropical and subtropical coastlines of most of the world’s continents and provide valuable ecosystem services such as fish habitat and storm buffering. Unfortunately, mangroves are one of the world’s most threatened tropical forest ecosystems, with an estimated 35 percent of the forests already gone worldwide and others being cleared daily for tourist developments, harbors, shrimp aquaculture, rice farms, salt production and other purposes.


Carbon Pools in African Mangrove Forests

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently announced funding for a proposal that involves the U.S. Forest Service, NASA, Duke University, and the University of Maryland in using field-based research as the basis for developing remote sensing tools to assess and monitor carbon pools in African mangrove forests. The project will use advanced 3-D remote sensing technology to map forest structure and extent as well as change over time.